When Should Parents Start Reading to Their Babies

father reading to his child

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Parents can read books to babies as soon as they come home from the hospital. You can start after a week after settling properly, and begin with fiction storybooks that have a good message or just simple baby storybooks.

For the first three months, babies only see black-and-white colour. Their vision is not fully developed to see colourful things. Parents can show flashcards and books with pictures, too. Babies love to see high-contrast black and white objects because it is something different from their blurry world.

You can buy books with black-and-white images suitable for babies and show them to them or stick various flashcards at different places in the room so that baby keeps seeing them. They will help lift their mood and also increase their concentration and eye coordination.

Reading books doesn’t only help in language development in kids but also builds up interest in reading in them. You, as a parent, should read books aloud to your baby. You may feel they are not listening, but it helps to develop their listening skills too.

You can make a reading schedule also for your baby and read books early in the morning when they wake up from their sleep and at night before going to bed. I opt for these two timings for my baby; you can make your own schedule according to your and your baby’s convenience. But, as much as possible, try to keep the same timing for every day. It will also help your child learn better time management.

For the first three months, introduce monochrome books and then go for colour books, board books, pop-up books, sound books, fabric books, etc. If you want me to tell the names of the books, please message me. I will be happy to suggest some.

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