Baby Teeth Order of Appearance

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Babies are sometimes born with their first tooth in place. This is mainly because the tooth buds are developed before they are born.

When Will the First Teeth of Your Baby Emerge?

Although some babies are born with teeth, this is not a very common occurrence. Babies normally start developing their first tooth when they hit the sixth-month mark or shortly after that.

Which Teeth Appear First

The first tooth generally appears when the baby is six months old. However, it may take longer for a few babies before the primary or deciduous teeth start emerging. In the order of teething in babies, it is usually the lower central incisors that appear first. However, some babies may start sporting new upper central incisors first.

How Many Teeth Does a Baby Have?

By the age of 3, you can expect your child to have a complete set of 20 milk teeth. These teeth are shed when they are around 5 years old, and make way for permanent teeth.

Baby Teeth Chart and Order of Appearance

Here is the teething chart that explains each type of tooth in the order of its appearance. Do remember that this is the general pattern of teething, but exceptions are not uncommon. It is okay if your child does not follow this baby teething order. However, if the diversion is a cause of concern, do meet a qualified dentist to discuss the issue.

Lower Central Incisors

The lower central incisors are often the very first teeth to erupt, and this can cause your baby to fuss, drool and even try to chew stuff.

Appearance:

Lower central incisors should start erupting at around six to ten months. You should be able to spot them as your baby starts fussing more due to the associated pain and discomfort that comes with teething.

Function: 

One of the key functions of lower central incisors is, to act as placeholders until the permanent teeth take shape when your child turns 12.

Shedding:

Your child should start shedding his lower central incisors once he hits 6 years of age.

Upper Central Incisors

Appearance:

The upper central incisors start to appear when the baby is between eight to twelve months old.

Function:

One of the key functions of upper central incisors is to act as placeholders for permanent teeth as well as to help the baby to chew its food.

Shedding:

Babies usually start to shed these at around 6 years of age.

Upper Lateral Incisors

Appearance:

The upper lateral incisors start appearing at around nine to thirteen months.

Function:

Upper lateral incisors enable your baby to chew and to help him to speak as well.

Shedding:

According to the sequence in which baby teeth fall out, your child should start shedding the upper lateral incisors at around 6 years of age.

Lower Lateral Incisors

Appearance:

Your baby should start developing the lower lateral incisors around ten to sixteen months. You should know that your baby will develop one tooth of each sort, before developing the next one of the same kind.

Function:

Lower lateral incisors act as placeholders for the permanent teeth which should start appearing when your child becomes 12. Apart from this, these milk teeth help your baby to chew and speak.

Shedding:

Your child should start shedding his lower lateral incisors once he reaches 6 years of age.

Upper First Molars

Appearance:

The upper first molars come in at around thirteen to nineteen months.

Function:

The key function of the upper first molars is to help your baby to chew and even help him to speak while acting as placeholders for permanent teeth.

Shedding:

Your child should start to shed his upper first molars at around 10 to 12 years, and by the time he hits 13, he should have permanent teeth.

Lower First Molars

Appearance:

The lower first molars should start erupting around fourteen to eighteen months after your baby is born.

Function:

When it comes to the function of milk teeth, the lower first molars help your baby to chew and masticate his food and at the same time serve as placeholders for permanent teeth.

Shedding:

Your child should start shedding his lower first molars around 10 to 12 years of age.

Upper Canine

Appearance:

Your baby should start sprouting upper canine almost at the end of the baby teeth sequence at around sixteen to twenty-two months.

Function:

One of the main functions of the upper canine is to serve as placeholders for the upper canine.

Shedding:

Your child should start shedding his upper canine once he reaches 10 to 12 years of age followed by a permanent set of teeth in its place.

Lower Canine

Appearance:

Your baby should start developing the lower canine at around seventeen to twenty-three months.

Function:

One of the key functions of the lower canine is to help your baby to chew as well as to serve as placeholders for permanent teeth

Shedding:

Your child should shed his lower canine anytime from 10 to 12 years of age.

Lower Second Molar

Appearance:

Your infant should start developing his lower second molar once he reaches twenty-three to thirty-one months of age.

Function:

One of the key functions of the lower second molar is to help your baby to chew, to speak  and to gnaw, apart from acting as placeholders for permanent teeth

Shedding:

Your child should start shedding his molars at around 10 to 12 years of age with permanent teeth soon taking shape after that.

Upper Second Molar

Appearance:

The upper second molars usually kick in when the baby reaches twenty-five months of age.

Function:

one of the key functions of upper molars is to act as placeholders. Apart from that, they also help the infant to chew his food.

Shedding:

your child should start shedding his upper second molar once he reaches 12 years of age.

When to Worry About Your Baby’s Teeth

If the sequence of your baby’s teeth is out of order, there’s no reason to be worried. There can be several reasons for the delay, but usually, your child should have all or nearly all his milk teeth in place in due time.

Conclusion

Milk teeth are often neglected as they are perceived as temporary teeth which are bound to fall out, but it is important to understand that the health of milk teeth directly impacts the health of permanent teeth. Ensure that you provide clean your infant’s gums with a soft cloth regularly, and switch to a baby brush when the first teeth emerge. Healthy teeth not only look good but also keep the child’s gut healthy.

Also Read: How to Take Care of Baby’s Emerging Teeth

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